How a Female Engineer Dredges the Deep Seabed

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Half the year, she lives and works on a 100-meter offshore vessel tracking underwater bombs, creating nautical charts, and building islands. When the work ends and all the men onboard go home to dry land, she moves to her floating home—a 12.5-meter sailboat—on which she and her husband sail the world. Last year, Emeline Veit spent only 10 days on dry land. She wouldn’t have it any other way. 

By Michelle Segrest - Reporting for World Pumps Magazine

The 26-year old engineer/hydrographic surveyor grew up in the south of France, in Sumene, a small village north of Montpellier. She spent her summers in Brittany with her parents and younger brother and knew she wanted live and work near the sea. “I always I wanted to do something with the ocean,” she said. “I chose an engineering school in Brest because all the engineering specialties they were offering were linked to the ocean.”

Sometimes Veit is the only woman on board her office—a 35-crew offshore vessel. Her role is significant. While in the North Sea, it is her job to find unexploded ordinance (UXOs), which are explosive weapons like bombs, shells, grenades, land mines, naval mines, cluster munition, etc., that did not explode when they were employed and still pose a risk of detonation, sometimes many decades after they were used or discarded. To read the full story, follow this link.

Building Projects from Scratch that Make an Impact

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For more than 30 years, Steve Tourigny has been involved in the design, development, and management of many products, processes, plants, and businesses. Through his experience, he gained expertise with startups, helping companies get key projects off the ground. With extensive engineering, operations and partnering experience, he now works has an independent consultant servicing a variety of industries in an advisory capacity. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for ValveWorld, ValveWorld Americas, and Pump Engineer

Steve Tourigny typically works with small- to medium-sized companies helping them work through new products or processes. They all want two things—low cost and fast results.  “They are all trying to find the ‘best of breed’ solutions,” he said. “They are all extremely cost and schedule conscious and are continuously evaluating their core competencies versus what should be farmed out to partners. I use my extensive experience and network of contacts to guide them in specific areas.” Follow this link to read the full article.

Identifying and Solving Technical Issues During Commissioning

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Interview with Kirill Zimin, Inside Sales Engineer, Ruhrpumpen Global

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc.

As a senior inside sales engineer, Kirill Zimin is in charge of sizing pumps and selecting  and acquiring quotes of its accessories. This requires meeting with customers as a technical expert. Working closely with the sales force at Ruhrpumpen Global, his team must accurately transfer orders to the manufacturing business unit in the oil and gas, power, chemical, metallurgy, and water industries.  Focusing mostly on the oil and gas market, Kirill has deep knowledge and experience. Project-to-project, he must meet customer needs while also resolving new design issues. Follow this link to read the full article.

For Problem Solving Pumps & Valves, Look at the System as a Whole

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Abhijit Ray Chauduri has been associated with pump and valve selection, evaluation, procurement, and operation supervision for nearly 34 years. Currently based in Kolkata, India, he is the head of the Pumping Systems Group inside the VA TECH WABAG organization. He oversees the selection, procurement, and operational issues related to pumps, valves, and the associated electrical and mechanical equipment. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Pump Engineer and Valve World

Many years ago, Abhijit Ray Chaudhuri had the opportunity to listen to a lecture by I. J. Karassik, a Russian-American engineer known for his pioneering work with pumps, He wrote over 1,100 technical articles and papers on pump use and maintenance, as well as several books, including Centrifugal Pump Selection, Operation and MaintenanceEngineers' Guide to Centrifugal Pumps, and Centrifugal Pump Clinic. He also co-wrote Pump Questions and Answers, and co-edited the Pump Handbook. The lecture inspired Abhijit to forge a similar career path. “Karassik was the grand old man of the pumping industry and I heard him in a seminar at Delhi while in my final year of mechanical engineering in college,” Abhijit said. “Inspired, I joined Worthington Corporation in India as a graduate engineer trainee. I learned the basics there during my tenure, especially about chemical process pumps as well as pumps for water services. Since valves are an integral part of any pumping system, I picked up working knowledge of them.” To read the full article, please follow this link. 

Engineering At Sea and On Land

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Running the engineering department on an aircraft carrier during the first Gulf War prepared Bruce Ames for a lifelong career that kept him busy in all types of industries—paper, power, trucking, and more. Now, a lubrication engineer with ExxonMobil, he uses his diverse skills to develop programs to help his customers save money, energy, and time.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Pump Engineer, Valve World and Valve World Americas

Bruce Ames’s family genes are deep in two things—engineering and the Navy. His engineer father and brother-in-law were Navy, and this family history inspired him to pursue and earn a four-year scholarship to Maine Maritime Academy. This is where he received a degree in marine engineering technology and acquired a Coast Guard license. He was commissioned by his Naval officer brother on graduation day, and shipped off to a three-year duty aboard the USS Forrestal

The 1,100-foot aircraft carrier was made famous when it caught on fire in July of 1967, triggering a chain-reaction of explosions that killed 134 sailors and injured 161. At the time, Forrestal was engaged in combat operations in the Gulf of Tonkin, during the Vietnam War. The ship survived, but with damage exceeding US$72 million, not including the damage to aircraft. Future United States Senator John McCain and future four-star admiral and U.S. Pacific Fleet Commander Ronald J. Zlatoper were among the survivors. Ames served his time on the Forrestal from 1989 to 1992, more than two decades later, but some of the explosion damage left challenges for the future engineers and operators. Read the full story by following this link. 

The Importance of Training

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Interview with Adolfo Gomez, Pump & Seal Trainer and Instructor

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Pump Engineer, Valve World, and Valve World Americas

Adolfo Gomez began his career working with agricultural irrigation. This led to hands-on work for chemical processing plants and oil refineries. His diverse experience developed into a passion for teaching and training young end users and sharing his more than three decades of knowledge and experience. Read the full story by following this link. 

Energy Efficient Engineering

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When it comes to working with customers to solve lubrication and engineering problems, Adam McMurtrey relies on a lifetime of experience that goes all the way back to his childhood. For ExxonMobil’s Mobil Serv program, he works closely with industries ranging from lead mines to chicken rendering plants—always with energy efficient lubrication at the forefront of every solution. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for ValveWorld, ValveWorld Americas, and Pump Engineer

Adam McMurtrey has a simple but effective process. “When I go to a customer in any type of manufacturing, I tell them that I do three things,” said McMurtrey, an industrial sales engineer for ExxonMobil Fuels & Lubricants Company. “I use the acronym ACE. I’ll analyze the operation. I’ll try to consolidate the lubricants and greases that they use to help avoid contamination and to simplify their process. And then I try to enhance their operation either by extending the life of the equipment, extending mean time between failures or time between overhaul or by extending the life of the oil.” Follow this link to read the full story. 

Isolate the Problem to Solve the Problem

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A small company president’s role involves much more than sitting in a corner office. Jody Millsap gets his hands dirty. “My personality is not that I can be content sitting in an office,” he said. “I like to interact with the customers, help with sales calls, and getting my hands on the equipment. President is just a title. You have to be a jack of all trades. I like to be out doing stuff and staying busy.”

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Valve World, Valve World Americas, and Pump Engineer

Solving problems for his customers is what sets Jody Millsap apart from the pack. “I love to investigate a problem and find a solution,” the 50-year-old president and owner of Water Solutions Engineering said. “This is what I really enjoy. This is one reason why I like to do consulting in addition to our regular work. The customer I started consulting with in 2012 had a 15-year-old problem. It was water related and we were able to solve it. This is what I really love to do—go in and help a customer solve an issue—to show what the problem was and show how we solved it. The gratification of doing that means the world to me.” To read the full story, please follow this link. 

Precise Calculation Leads to High Performance Equipment

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Johan Meijer has spent the past four decades solving engineering problems related to pumping system design—working closely with valves, pumps, and hoses. His experience and knowledge became so deep he developed a powerful and strategic calculation program for high pressure peristaltic pumps that is provided free to end users. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Valve World, Pump Engineer, Hose+Coupling World

Seven years ago, Meijer and his wife decided to make a lifestyle change and moved to southern Spain, where he started his own business. The business began with wastewater treatment consultancy, working on polymer dosing systems, and foamed concrete systems for the pre-fab construction industry. In addition to all these activities Meijer continued to develop a program for calculating the most effective pump sizes of high pressure peristaltic pumping systems. 

To read the full story, please follow this link. 

Tips for Maintaining Brewery Equipment

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Justin Farmer has worked in food and beverage processing more than half his life. As a teenager, he learned from his father, who was a master electrician and an industrial maintenance manager and engineer. He started at the bottom, but quickly earned the experience and knowledge to work his way into a leadership role at Rhinegeist Brewery in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he is transforming the maintenance and reliability programs of the historic brewery.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Valve World and Pump Engineer

Justin Farmer has seen maintenance and reliability from every angle. While working with his father in the maintenance department at a tortilla plant in Northeast Georgia when he was 16 years old, Farmer had the opportunity to learn all about maintaining pumps and valves from senior mechanics. “They taught me the basics like motor replacement, gear replacement, and how to repair failed transfer systems,” the 35-year old Facilities and Maintenance Manager said. “There was a great amount of knowledge to be learned. Of course, I was one of the young ones, so I didn’t get a lot of the good jobs. I started at the bottom working in the water treatment pit. Most of my friends were out having fun, and I was working my tail off. But this was how I could spend time with my father.”  Follow this link to read the full story. 

PM Helps Eliminate DM

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Michael Flint drives a preventive-maintenance strategy at Brown University to help direct wasted man-hours toward reducing a large and growing deferred-maintenance backlog.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Efficient Plant Magazine

Growing up on a dairy farm in western New York state, Michael Flint learned early the value of proper maintenance and the safe operation of equipment. He also learned the importance of properly caring for the livestock. Though he didn’t know it at the time, this experience prepared him for his current challenge—driving a seven-year program at Brown Univ., designed to redirect 57,000 work-process man-hours used to maintain 226 buildings covering 6.34-million sq. ft. at the Providence, RI, campus. Read the full article. 

Bionics Drive Future Factories

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Festo’s Bionic Learning Network studies the movement and behavior of animals in nature to inspire interactive, intelligent technology and machines that stretch the boundaries of factory automation.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

Walk through Festo’s headquarters in Esslingen, Germany, and you’ll witness what appears to be science fiction. Artificial intelligence and energy efficiency are deeply imbedded into its bionic robots. The engineers at Festo believe that by turning to nature to study the behavior, movement, and communication techniques of mammals, insects, and reptiles, you can build a smart factory with advanced automation. In fact, you can build the factory of the future. Please follow this link to read the full story. 

Hydraulic Transient Simulation Analysis Predicts and Solves Problems

As a Senior Hydraulics Engineer for Freese and Nichols, Inc., Tom Hill solves problems for his clients by building hydraulic transient simulation models of pump stations and pipelines. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Valve World Americas and Pump Engineer

Whether onsite with his hands on the equipment, or in front of his computer utilizing simulation software, Tom Hill has spent nearly four decades solving problems for his clients. Through the simulation process, he constructs models that can be utilized to demonstrate upset conditions such as tripped pumps, broken pipe, closing valves, or emergency shutdown operations. 

For the full story, follow this link. 

Oil and Gas Trends

Pump suppliers discuss trends and challenges in the oil and gas industry involving smart technology, competitive delivery, and optimized equipment efficiency.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc., Reporting for Maintenance Technology

Speed, portability, and reliability are key factors in optimizing production times and the bottom line in the oil and gas industry, according to experts from major pumping technology companies. Glenn Webb, senior product specialist for Blackmer, Grand Rapids, MI, a leading brand from PSG, (Oakbrook Terrace, IL) said that the most obvious positive manifestation of the ongoing oil and natural gas production boom in the United States can be seen on street corners across the nation. For the full article, please follow this link.

Closing the Talent Gap

As the reliability engineer for CountryMark, Cody David represents the new generation in an industry that continues to face the challenges of an aging workforce.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc., - Reporting for Pump Engineer and Valve World Americas

With a decade of rotating equipment experience, Cody David works hard every day to do his part to help close the talent gap. He accomplishes this by soaking in the knowledge of those who came before him and applying the lessons learned in every project he tackles.

Click this link to read the full story.

Reliability on a Global Scale

Petrochemical plant in India commits to superior maintenance to build a world-class program.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

Enter the gates of the Reliance Industries Limited (RIL) Hazira manufacturing division site in Gujarat, India, to find perfectly manicured landscaping with plush trees, bright-green lawns, and flower beds containing thousands of daisies, basoras, exora, petunia, and other varieties decorating the entire 1,000-acre campus. Though visitors may feel as if they are at an exclusive vacation resort, deep within the beauty of the grounds, serious manufacturing is at work—27 individual chemical and petrochemical plants that operate above capacity and with superior maintenance, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Read the full story to discover the truly unique programs being implemented by this world-class manufacturing facility. 

Improve Chemical Pump Maintenance

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc., Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

Regardless of the industry, in chemical-pumping applications, it’s important to understand how the chemical reacts to heat, pressure, and flow. Just as crucial is the need to consider all system components in these applications. One maintenance misstep could be catastrophic. Jim Raiders, senior technology engineer for Akzo Nobel Pulp and Performance Chemicals Inc., Chicago, offered the following advice for keeping chemical-processing pumps well maintained and reliable. To read the full article follow this link. 

Top Reliability Tips for Maintaining Food & Beverage Processing Pumps

Food-and-beverage pumps are subjected to extensive and harsh cleaning procedures to assure that they meet all health regulations.

By Michelle Segrest, Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

It can be as smooth and clear as water or wine, or as sticky and thick as cookie dough or peanut butter. Regardless the viscosity, one thing remains a top priority when pumping processed food and beverages—no corners can be cut when it comes to keeping the systems clean and hygienically safe.

Read more, including specific real-world examples, by following this link.

Getting it Done Right

Engineer uses methodical process and attention to detail in her professional and personal life.

By Michelle Segrest, Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

Rebekah Macko approaches every task with one simple philosophy in mind: It’s more important to get it done right than to get it done right now. Her father taught her this lesson early in life. An organic geochemist, his approach to all things revolved around a methodical process, the success of which he passed down to his daughter.  Click here to read the full story

Click here to view multi-media coverage of the 11th Geiger Mid-Atlantic Pump & Process Equipment Symposium XI

Inject Reliability in Water and Wastewater Pumps

Address the most common problems and follow best maintenance practices to keep critical water movers running around the clock.

By Michelle Segrest, Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

One faulty $5,000 pump in a wastewater-treatment facility can shut down an entire operation and end up costing the company or municipality $500,000/day, according to Jim Elsey, vice president and general manager of Summit Pump Inc., Green Bay, WI. Why do pumps fail? The 44-year veteran of the pump repair and maintenance business has five very specific reasons and they all trace back to the people who are charged with making those pumps perform and those who provide (or don’t) the resources needed to purchase, install, and service the devices that form the backbone of every water-handling system. To read the full story, click here.