Combine Hard & Soft Skills for Effective Energy Management Program

Bill Allemon 081618.jpg

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Pump Engineer and ValveWorld

Bill Allemon is an electrical engineer with an MBA, and has found a niche using both his engineering and business skills. He develops and implements strategic energy management plans leveraging Operational Excellence tools. He said that throughout his career, he has found himself somewhere between the C-Suite and field operations, communicating strategic concepts and nebulous goals into effective strategies that deliver value for his clients. Please follow this link to read the full article.

Additive Technology Can Improve Performance

1809feature01p.jpg

Companies can produce more reliable and efficient components faster and with fewer resources using 3D-printing technology. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Efficient Plant Magazine

Ryan Hooley vividly remembers when General Electric’s (GE) aviation department manufactured a fuel-nozzle component using 3D-printing technology. Traditionally, the component was made of many smaller components. It required welding and assembly—processes that needed time, energy, and materials. But GE found a way to produce a fuel nozzle using additive manufacturing—specifically, 3D printing.  “They were able to make it in one shot, one part,” said Hooley, general manager of product management for GE’s Power Services business in the B/E class fleets. “But additive manufacturing is not just looking at the value propositions like assembly, cost, and cycle. Now we can look at actually improving performance. When people hear 3D printing, I wonder if they realize how it’s being used today. It seems very futuristic. This upgrade is evidence that additive manufacturing is here today. It’s relevant, and it delivers value. Additive manufacturing is fundamentally changing what we can do. It’s not 10 years away. It’s here.” Follow this link to read the full story.

Energy Efficient Engineering

Adam McMurtrey Lync.jpg
When it comes to working with customers to solve lubrication and engineering problems, Adam McMurtrey relies on a lifetime of experience that goes all the way back to his childhood. For ExxonMobil’s Mobil Serv program, he works closely with industries ranging from lead mines to chicken rendering plants—always with energy efficient lubrication at the forefront of every solution. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for ValveWorld, ValveWorld Americas, and Pump Engineer

Adam McMurtrey has a simple but effective process. “When I go to a customer in any type of manufacturing, I tell them that I do three things,” said McMurtrey, an industrial sales engineer for ExxonMobil Fuels & Lubricants Company. “I use the acronym ACE. I’ll analyze the operation. I’ll try to consolidate the lubricants and greases that they use to help avoid contamination and to simplify their process. And then I try to enhance their operation either by extending the life of the equipment, extending mean time between failures or time between overhaul or by extending the life of the oil.” Follow this link to read the full story. 

Educating Work-Ready Students

1805foakland02p.jpg
Oakland University program works closely with local manufacturers to create a program that provides experienced workers based on industry needs.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Efficient Plant Magazine

In Southeast Michigan, within a 60-mi. radius of the Oakland Univ. Rochester, MI, campus, there are thousands of major manufacturing companies representing automotive, metals, machinery, food and beverage, plastics, rubber, bioscience, furniture, chemical products, energy, computer and electronics, and defense. These companies need industrial and systems engineers who are ready to go to work right out of college. Oakland’s Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISE) Department is giving them what they need.  “Our program is all about educating engineers for a lifetime,” said Robert Van Til, Ph.D., the school’s Chair and Pawley Professor of Lean Studies, Industrial & Systems Engineering Department (oakland.edu/ise). “It’s not about training someone to be super productive one day on the job. We are preparing engineers to be work ready right out of college.” Follow this link to read the full story. 

Precise Calculation Leads to High Performance Equipment

111-headshot copy.jpg
Johan Meijer has spent the past four decades solving engineering problems related to pumping system design—working closely with valves, pumps, and hoses. His experience and knowledge became so deep he developed a powerful and strategic calculation program for high pressure peristaltic pumps that is provided free to end users. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Valve World, Pump Engineer, Hose+Coupling World

Seven years ago, Meijer and his wife decided to make a lifestyle change and moved to southern Spain, where he started his own business. The business began with wastewater treatment consultancy, working on polymer dosing systems, and foamed concrete systems for the pre-fab construction industry. In addition to all these activities Meijer continued to develop a program for calculating the most effective pump sizes of high pressure peristaltic pumping systems. 

To read the full story, please follow this link. 

Pump Industry Heroes

IMG_2418.JPG
The pump industry can never be accused of being a glamourous one. Nevertheless, individuals are often called on to perform vital and sometimes dramatic tasks in the midst of crisis and disaster – turning those participants into ‘unsung heroes.’

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for World Pumps Magazine

Super heroes come in all shapes and sizes. And even without the power of invisibility, they often go unnoticed. They don’t wear a cape or possess super strength, but when disaster strikes, they load up powerful pump equipment and throw themselves directly into the eye of the storm to help those in need. Whether providing clean water to communities that don’t have it, or removing excess floodwater after a natural disaster, these pump industry professionals became heroes to communities in crisis. Follow this link to read about a few examples:

Tips for Maintaining Brewery Equipment

end_user_justin_farmer_V1.jpg
Justin Farmer has worked in food and beverage processing more than half his life. As a teenager, he learned from his father, who was a master electrician and an industrial maintenance manager and engineer. He started at the bottom, but quickly earned the experience and knowledge to work his way into a leadership role at Rhinegeist Brewery in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he is transforming the maintenance and reliability programs of the historic brewery.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Valve World and Pump Engineer

Justin Farmer has seen maintenance and reliability from every angle. While working with his father in the maintenance department at a tortilla plant in Northeast Georgia when he was 16 years old, Farmer had the opportunity to learn all about maintaining pumps and valves from senior mechanics. “They taught me the basics like motor replacement, gear replacement, and how to repair failed transfer systems,” the 35-year old Facilities and Maintenance Manager said. “There was a great amount of knowledge to be learned. Of course, I was one of the young ones, so I didn’t get a lot of the good jobs. I started at the bottom working in the water treatment pit. Most of my friends were out having fun, and I was working my tail off. But this was how I could spend time with my father.”  Follow this link to read the full story. 

Be Aware of Wear Before Failure

1712pumpsupp03p.jpg
A chemical-pump expert shows how preventive maintenance can ensure chemical pumping performance.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Efficient Plant Magazine

Understanding that flow components such as diaphragms and check valves will start to show wear before they fail can be strong motivation to incorporate an effective preventive-maintenance program for chemical-processing equipment, according to metering-pump expert Jim Holts, senior technical sales manager, dosing pump line, Grundfos Pumps Corp. (us.grundfos.com, Downers Grove, IL). “It is very common in this industry to say, ‘I’m going to wait until something fails, and then fix it,’” Holts explained. “Proactive maintenance is the key. When the components start to wear, you will start to lose the accuracy of your pump, which is one of the reasons you bought a metering pump to begin with—for it’s high, repeatable accuracy. And since we may classify metering pumps more on the instrumentation side, just remember that you are paying for something you are not getting if you are not doing proper maintenance.” To read the full story, please follow this link. 

Avoid Common Pump Spec Mistakes

1710fpumpsupp01p.jpg

When it comes to keeping food and beverage pumps running efficiently, a pump expert identifies errors you should avoid.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Efficient Plant Magazine

For the past 30 years, Jim McCormick has been solving problems for his sanitary- and process-equipment customers. Most of the time, he says, these problems could have been avoided. “There are a lot of things I’ve learned over the years as far as things that can go wrong and why pumps fail,” said McCormick, director of sales and corporate development applications and technical sales engineer for SANI-PUMP Inc., Sanitary Pumps and Equipment (sani-pump.com, Chattanooga, TN).  “I’ve made a list of some of the reasons this happens. I work closely with my customers to hopefully avoid these common mistakes.” To read the full story, please follow this link. 

Remote Problem Solving

RandyEstep03p cropped.jpeg
For Randy Estep, the bottom line is designing a safe, cost effective and reliable solution for the application— getting the right pump with the right seal to move a specific fluid for a specific reason. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Pump Engineer

Randy Estep’s experience is deep and diverse. For nearly four decades he has done everything from designing, installing, maintaining and troubleshooting equipment to ordering parts, analyzing bids and working directly with manufacturers and suppliers. This depth of experience prepared him to troubleshoot and make process and equipment improvements every day for Dow Chemical. “To be an expert, in my opinion, you need a wide range of experience combining both field support and project support,” he says. “Understanding the engineering fundamentals is very important. The value I bring to capital projects and designing new equipment is because I have experience on both sides of the fence.”  Read the full story. 

Integrating Automation into Manufacturing

1710profile011p_draper.jpg
Draper Inc. experiences a century-long evolution of product diversity and manufacturing transitions while holding firm to its family-owned foundation. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Efficient Plant Magazine

A few things have changed in the 115 years since fifth-generation, family-owned Draper Inc. opened its doors for business in the small town of Spiceland, IN, in 1902. There were no phones, no cars, and no computers. Less than 20 years ago, operators still used bulky, 5-lb. scissors to hand cut fabric shades and projection screens, and a seamstress would sit at a table and operate a traditional sewing machine with a foot pedal. Today, following a focus on lean manufacturing that began in 2000, automated machines do the cutting and sewing and much of the other manufacturing for the company that is located just 40 miles east of Indianapolis. Read the full story. 

Filling the Skills Gap

img_0822.jpg
This maintenance and reliability leader builds successful programs while leveraging key skills and making sure all bases are covered.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Efficient Plant Magazine

George Parada has a knack for filling the gap.  While building expertise in development and change management, he began to also develop a sixth sense about what was missing. “When you think about implementing reliability, change management is so important,” said Parada, CMRP and the maintenance and reliability leader for Cargill Salt Inc., Newark, CA. “You have to know how you are going to manage your stakeholders and understand what is the communication plan for each individual."  Please follow this link to read the full story. 

Highly Charged Reliability

1708voice02p-300x400.jpg
Bill Myers spearheads an Electrical Maintenance Program that helps AstraZeneca’s West Chester, OH, facility become safe and reliable.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

Bill Myers learned the hard way that sometimes we are taught more by our mistakes than our successes. In the end, he was able to learn from both. “Ten years ago, a small mistake was made with an electrical connection, and it turned into a big issue,” said Myers, AstraZeneca’s senior engineering technician at the West Chester, OH, facility. “In this line of work, mistakes are dangerous. You must learn from them, and quickly.” To read the full story and learn Bill's Top 5 Reliability Tips, follow this link. 

Reliable Security Depends on Reliable Operations

A focus on PM optimization, culture change, sustainable processes, and employee empowerment drives reliability efforts at the Y-12 National Security Complex mini city.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

Spanning 2.5 miles between its east and west boundaries, the 74-yr.-old Y-12 National Security Complex is a “mini city” inside the city of Oak Ridge, TN. Within its secure borders, are 379 buildings of manufacturing, production, laboratory, support, and research and development areas managed by Consolidated Nuclear Security LLC (CNS) under contract for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). To read the full story, please follow this link. 

Powering Auto Production

A highly sophisticated electrical protection-and-control system helps Mercedes-Benz keep the power running and its people and equipment safe.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

When electric current flows through an air gap between conductors, it creates an arc flash. Sparks fly, equipment can explode, and anyone who happens to be nearby can be injured—or even killed. 

To read the full story and to view informative videos, please follow this link. 

A Targeted Focus Leads to Reliability

Working in various locations around the globe, KRATON’s Ron Bitely keeps all focus pointed at a target that never moves.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

Ron Bitely believes that everyone needs to have a North Star. “We should all have direction in whatever we are doing,” he said. “I don’t like to use the word ‘vision’ because many people consider this just another buzz word that has little meaning. But people can relate to following a North Star that remains constant. Targets move. People need direction so they can make decisions that will create value for their company.” To read the full story, please follow this link. 

Redefining Reliability

Biopharmaceutical manufacturing company AstraZeneca leverages an advanced reliability program to streamline more-effective maintenance processes.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

Even though the AstraZeneca manufacturing facility in Mt. Vernon, IN, looks like a hospital surgical unit—with key equipment separated into concentrated clean rooms—for years it operated like an emergency room. When an equipment breakdown occurred, personnel jumped into action, triaging the issue and not always looking into the true symptoms to prevent future occurrences. Follow this link to read the full story. 

 

Hydraulic Transient Simulation Analysis Predicts and Solves Problems

As a Senior Hydraulics Engineer for Freese and Nichols, Inc., Tom Hill solves problems for his clients by building hydraulic transient simulation models of pump stations and pipelines. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content - Reporting for Valve World Americas and Pump Engineer

Whether onsite with his hands on the equipment, or in front of his computer utilizing simulation software, Tom Hill has spent nearly four decades solving problems for his clients. Through the simulation process, he constructs models that can be utilized to demonstrate upset conditions such as tripped pumps, broken pipe, closing valves, or emergency shutdown operations. 

For the full story, follow this link. 

Training, Automation, Innovation Drive Reliability

German-based Aquatherm provides reliable, sustainable pipe production as a result of advanced technology, automation, and in-house design and innovation.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

As one of the first three companies in the European market to manufacture under-floor heating systems, Attendorn, Germany-based Aquatherm has come a long way since the company was founded 44 years ago. It now leverages state-of-the-art automation and innovative energy-saving systems to drive its reliability and sustainability programs. For the full article and more, please follow this link.

Lubrication Best Practices from a Hoarder of Information

When it comes to lubrication, Scott Arrington relies on 34 years of information gathering to ensure he always has the correct answer for his customers.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Reporting for Maintenance Technology Magazine

Scott Arrington is a hoarder—a self-described hoarder of information, that is. The World Wide Web is not big enough to hold all the information upon which he relies. In fact, he has so many manuals, binders, and oil samples, he needs two offices—one to work in, and another to contain all the valuable records, documentation, and research he will never throw away. 

To read the full story, please follow this link.