Building Projects from Scratch that Make an Impact

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For more than 30 years, Steve Tourigny has been involved in the design, development, and management of many products, processes, plants, and businesses. Through his experience, he gained expertise with startups, helping companies get key projects off the ground. With extensive engineering, operations and partnering experience, he now works has an independent consultant servicing a variety of industries in an advisory capacity. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for ValveWorld, ValveWorld Americas, and Pump Engineer

Steve Tourigny typically works with small- to medium-sized companies helping them work through new products or processes. They all want two things—low cost and fast results.  “They are all trying to find the ‘best of breed’ solutions,” he said. “They are all extremely cost and schedule conscious and are continuously evaluating their core competencies versus what should be farmed out to partners. I use my extensive experience and network of contacts to guide them in specific areas.” Follow this link to read the full article.

Solve Pump & Valve Problems in Various Industries

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A customer-oriented approach combined with experience in a variety of industries has helped Tolga Arslan become an expert in maintaining and servicing a variety of pumps and valves and other hydraulic equipment. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Valve World and Pump Engineer

When it comes to solving problems with pumps and valves, it’s important to consider the industry and the type of pump. For Tolga Arslan, his varied experience in various industries has helped him to understand the specifics of pump and valve maintenance and reliability. For example, in the chemical industry, the focus may not be on the valve or the pump at all. When challenges present themselves, perhaps an examination of the mechanical seal is in order. “Especially in the chemical industry, transferring some chemicals can be difficult and dangerous,” he said. “Most companies prefer pumps with mechanical seals. The most common problem with mechanical seals are problems with the seal’s tightness. This is why I like to solve this problem by recommending and using magnetic coupling pumps.” Read the full article by following this link.

For Problem Solving Pumps & Valves, Look at the System as a Whole

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Abhijit Ray Chauduri has been associated with pump and valve selection, evaluation, procurement, and operation supervision for nearly 34 years. Currently based in Kolkata, India, he is the head of the Pumping Systems Group inside the VA TECH WABAG organization. He oversees the selection, procurement, and operational issues related to pumps, valves, and the associated electrical and mechanical equipment. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Pump Engineer and Valve World

Many years ago, Abhijit Ray Chaudhuri had the opportunity to listen to a lecture by I. J. Karassik, a Russian-American engineer known for his pioneering work with pumps, He wrote over 1,100 technical articles and papers on pump use and maintenance, as well as several books, including Centrifugal Pump Selection, Operation and MaintenanceEngineers' Guide to Centrifugal Pumps, and Centrifugal Pump Clinic. He also co-wrote Pump Questions and Answers, and co-edited the Pump Handbook. The lecture inspired Abhijit to forge a similar career path. “Karassik was the grand old man of the pumping industry and I heard him in a seminar at Delhi while in my final year of mechanical engineering in college,” Abhijit said. “Inspired, I joined Worthington Corporation in India as a graduate engineer trainee. I learned the basics there during my tenure, especially about chemical process pumps as well as pumps for water services. Since valves are an integral part of any pumping system, I picked up working knowledge of them.” To read the full article, please follow this link. 

Engineering At Sea and On Land

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Running the engineering department on an aircraft carrier during the first Gulf War prepared Bruce Ames for a lifelong career that kept him busy in all types of industries—paper, power, trucking, and more. Now, a lubrication engineer with ExxonMobil, he uses his diverse skills to develop programs to help his customers save money, energy, and time.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Pump Engineer, Valve World and Valve World Americas

Bruce Ames’s family genes are deep in two things—engineering and the Navy. His engineer father and brother-in-law were Navy, and this family history inspired him to pursue and earn a four-year scholarship to Maine Maritime Academy. This is where he received a degree in marine engineering technology and acquired a Coast Guard license. He was commissioned by his Naval officer brother on graduation day, and shipped off to a three-year duty aboard the USS Forrestal

The 1,100-foot aircraft carrier was made famous when it caught on fire in July of 1967, triggering a chain-reaction of explosions that killed 134 sailors and injured 161. At the time, Forrestal was engaged in combat operations in the Gulf of Tonkin, during the Vietnam War. The ship survived, but with damage exceeding US$72 million, not including the damage to aircraft. Future United States Senator John McCain and future four-star admiral and U.S. Pacific Fleet Commander Ronald J. Zlatoper were among the survivors. Ames served his time on the Forrestal from 1989 to 1992, more than two decades later, but some of the explosion damage left challenges for the future engineers and operators. Read the full story by following this link. 

The Importance of Training

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Interview with Adolfo Gomez, Pump & Seal Trainer and Instructor

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Pump Engineer, Valve World, and Valve World Americas

Adolfo Gomez began his career working with agricultural irrigation. This led to hands-on work for chemical processing plants and oil refineries. His diverse experience developed into a passion for teaching and training young end users and sharing his more than three decades of knowledge and experience. Read the full story by following this link. 

Energy Efficient Engineering

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When it comes to working with customers to solve lubrication and engineering problems, Adam McMurtrey relies on a lifetime of experience that goes all the way back to his childhood. For ExxonMobil’s Mobil Serv program, he works closely with industries ranging from lead mines to chicken rendering plants—always with energy efficient lubrication at the forefront of every solution. 

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for ValveWorld, ValveWorld Americas, and Pump Engineer

Adam McMurtrey has a simple but effective process. “When I go to a customer in any type of manufacturing, I tell them that I do three things,” said McMurtrey, an industrial sales engineer for ExxonMobil Fuels & Lubricants Company. “I use the acronym ACE. I’ll analyze the operation. I’ll try to consolidate the lubricants and greases that they use to help avoid contamination and to simplify their process. And then I try to enhance their operation either by extending the life of the equipment, extending mean time between failures or time between overhaul or by extending the life of the oil.” Follow this link to read the full story. 

Isolate the Problem to Solve the Problem

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A small company president’s role involves much more than sitting in a corner office. Jody Millsap gets his hands dirty. “My personality is not that I can be content sitting in an office,” he said. “I like to interact with the customers, help with sales calls, and getting my hands on the equipment. President is just a title. You have to be a jack of all trades. I like to be out doing stuff and staying busy.”

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Valve World, Valve World Americas, and Pump Engineer

Solving problems for his customers is what sets Jody Millsap apart from the pack. “I love to investigate a problem and find a solution,” the 50-year-old president and owner of Water Solutions Engineering said. “This is what I really enjoy. This is one reason why I like to do consulting in addition to our regular work. The customer I started consulting with in 2012 had a 15-year-old problem. It was water related and we were able to solve it. This is what I really love to do—go in and help a customer solve an issue—to show what the problem was and show how we solved it. The gratification of doing that means the world to me.” To read the full story, please follow this link. 

Tips for Maintaining Brewery Equipment

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Justin Farmer has worked in food and beverage processing more than half his life. As a teenager, he learned from his father, who was a master electrician and an industrial maintenance manager and engineer. He started at the bottom, but quickly earned the experience and knowledge to work his way into a leadership role at Rhinegeist Brewery in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he is transforming the maintenance and reliability programs of the historic brewery.

By Michelle Segrest, Navigate Content, Inc. - Reporting for Valve World and Pump Engineer

Justin Farmer has seen maintenance and reliability from every angle. While working with his father in the maintenance department at a tortilla plant in Northeast Georgia when he was 16 years old, Farmer had the opportunity to learn all about maintaining pumps and valves from senior mechanics. “They taught me the basics like motor replacement, gear replacement, and how to repair failed transfer systems,” the 35-year old Facilities and Maintenance Manager said. “There was a great amount of knowledge to be learned. Of course, I was one of the young ones, so I didn’t get a lot of the good jobs. I started at the bottom working in the water treatment pit. Most of my friends were out having fun, and I was working my tail off. But this was how I could spend time with my father.”  Follow this link to read the full story.